Meeting 2

Meeting 2

 Meeting 2 took place at Imperial College, London 28th May 2010. Download the agenda.

Developing academic language in science

 Key questions:
  • What does academic language look like in science?
  • How can we measure and develop academic vocabulary?

This element introduced the Academic Word List and a framework for classifying subject language.

Resources:
 
The AWL tools are located at http://awl.londongt.org - this part of our site is open access, no password is required to use it.
 
AWL highlighter. Try using the tool following the process shown in session 2. Practice using the Mother of all Pandemics article (link opens in new window). Copy the text [ctrl-c] from the first section and paste into the highlighter [ctrl-p]. Click submit and you will see the AWL words highligted in the text. Clicking the link for any of these will launch the google define function which can be used to explore potential meanings for the word in the ocntext in which it has been used.
 
AWL test. This takes about 20 minutes to complete. Learners taking the test are asked for their name and school – provided this information is completed we can access and analyse the test results with you.  Once the test has been completed learners can use the Google define function to follow up on any issues.
 
In addition to the AWL handout above you can download a file AWL in Science in which the language which is most relevant to the classroom is highlighted in red. Highlighted words are either (1) subject language, (2) command words, or (3) words which are use in formal talk and writing. Feel free to edit or amend this document. We would be grateful for feedback on whether these are the right words (at either KS2 or KS3, and how you use it).
 

EAL Planning tools

Key question:

  • How useful are the models commonly used by the EAL community in supporting planning for the use of thinking skills in science?

This section explored how we can support advanced learners in accessing challenge in using thinking skills without negating the challenge in the learning. Using the examples of Odd One Out and What am I? from meeting 1, We explored how conventional planning tools for EAL have significant limitations in helping colleagues to scaffold learning in creative settings.

Resources:

Practical Science with DNA as a context

Key question:

  • How can we support and scaffold learning for advanced learners without removing the challenge from the task?

This session involved a practical activity on DNA.

Resources:

Questioning

More ideas from the Bright Ideas time - big questions

Key questions:

  • how can we use questioning to provide classroom challenge?

Helen Wilson provided an overview of how we can develop classroom questioning using ideas from the Bright Ideas Time.

Resources:

  • The Big Question PowerPoint - this is the full version, not the abridged handout issued on the day
  • More ideas for big questions

Socratic discussion

We briefly introduced the classroom talk strategy Socratic circles. These involve an inner circle of students in a small group dicussion and a larger outer circle who act as observers.  The aim is to develop exploratory talk and thinking and to develop the noticing skills of learners  to identify what good questioning looks like and how they can develop their own skills.

Resources: